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October 2020
Luxembourg in Transition 2050

Landscape Fragmentation in Luxembourg.
© Nikos Katsikis, University of Luxembourg.

The tender "Luxembourg in Transition: Spatial Visions for the Zero-Carbon and Resilient Future of the Luxembourg Functional Region", launched by the Luxembourg Ministry for Spatial Planning calls for regional development, urban planning and architectural visions for the functional space of Luxembourg, with the aim to address the ecological challenges of the 21st century and to respond to the changing climatic conditions. How should the development of this region, its landscapes, its urban fabrics, its infrastructures and its architectures be designed in order to drastically reduce CO2 emissions, and protect and regenerate natural resources and biodiversity, while being resilient to the effects of global warming and climate change? This is probably the greatest challenge that world societies, in general, and each region in particular, are facing at the moment, and it goes far beyond the question of the design of built and unbuilt spaces. It implies fundamental transformations of the systems that meet essential needs: What new forms of economy, labour and housing, what new ways of production and resource use, what new practices of nutrition and consumption, what new structures of administration, ownership and participation will have to be developed to meet this colossal task? In other words, how should our economy, our lifestyles and our governance processes change in order to overcome the fossil age and, to bring a set of the IPCC's central quantitative goals into play, reduce annual per-capita CO2 emissions to less than one tonne and our ecological footprint from eight planets to one?

The University of Luxembourg with its Department of Geography and Spatial Planning and its Department of Engineering together with the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST), the Centre for Ecological Learning (CELL), the Institute of Organic Agriculture (IBLA) and the Office for Landscape Morphology (OLM) – a consortium of planners, researchers and a variety of actors invested in the local production of space – have been selected to develop prospects for a regenerative city-landscape. Besides regional planning, landscape architecture, urban planning and design, and architecture, the team will work on the fields of agroecology, food system transformation, biodiversity, energy systems, alternative economies, and participation as well as multi-level transition governance.

Link to Luxembourg in Transition call

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